Barclays bank goes down over the weekend, millions unable to access cash or use credit cards

A server crash on Barclays network Saturday gave many customers an unwanted glimpse into the chaotic future of a cashless, automated society. The crash left many unable to access their funds, unable to use internet or telephone banking and caused many cash machines to go down as a result of hardware failure.

Customers noted that their debit cards were declined even for small purchases like a 17p banana. Many took to social media to express frustration over the inability to withdraw money from in ATMs or be able to pay for purchases in shops and pubs around the world. Some reported being stranded because they could not access funds to buy tickets to return home. Others expressed desperation of not being able to feed themselves or their families.

Panic set in when Barclay’s admitted they had not idea how long it would take to fix the issue, even speculating that it could take until Monday. The bank released a statement saying it was “working to fix” a problem and advised customers to use other banks’ cash machines. It added that telephone banking and in-branch payments were also affected and apologized “for any inconvenience.” Barclays also reiterated the fact that no customer will lose out financially because of the hardware crash and any relevant fees would be reimbursed as soon as possible, another concern that some users called out.

There is still no word how many of Barclay’s 15 million card customers were affected by the outage. There is no doubt this experience echoes the fears and concerns many still have of completely cashless societies. Becoming dependent on cards leaves us vulnerable to situations like this. And the increase of automation results in fewer bank branches where you can go in and manually withdraw money from your account.

Globalists have indoctrinated many of us to believe that electronic currency is more convenient and easier to access than paper currency. But the advantage for cash remains that it is tangible and can be used to trade goods at face value, whereas we see in this scenario that if the value on your debit or credit card cannot be accessed, it doesn’t exist.

The bottom line is even though it is convenient both forms of payment are necessary, and card users should not become overly dependent plastic. We should all be in the habit of carrying some cash on our person at all times to avoid being completely susceptible in situations like this.

THOMASDISHAW.COM

THOMASDISHAW.COM

Born and raised in the backwoods of Michigan, Thomas Dishaw is an independent writer and entrepreneur. His work has been criticized in Slate, Right Wing Watch, Gawker, Daily Mail, and NY Daily News. Thomas currently writes for NaturalNews.com and resides in Delaware with his wife and Shih Tzu, where they enjoy healthy eating, politics, MSU Spartans and conservative values.
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